Pursuit of Motivation

Tis the season to get in shape! Usually at the beginning of every year, countless people resolve to lose weight/get healthy/ improve their body. And, unfortunately, most of those people don’t follow through with pursuing their goals. Life can get in the way or, more often than not, they just get discouraged by their slow progress, or lack thereof. 

Curiosity can be a big motivator… Aren’t you curious what your body is really capable of?

I’ve been a personal trainer for almost 15 years, and though I am by no means am expert on motivation and sports psychology, through my experience, I have seen tendencies and trends with a lot of people in the arena of health and weight loss. What I’ve seen is that most people begin their health journey out of a negative relationship to their body–they don’t like their body, they don’t like how they look, and it makes them feel negatively about themselves. So they try to lose weight to feel better. Well, this is a very negative view on fitness–it seeks to subtract from your life (deprive yourself of food, reduce your weight, shrink your body, etc…) as opposed to adding to it. People use this negative mental state as motivation to change their body. But this motivation only lasts as long as they are in that unhealthy/negative headspace. As soon as they get in a healthier mental state, that motivation to improve their physical disappears. 

Then so begins a toxic cycle of self loathing, wanting to get healthy, getting healthy, and then losing the motivation to be healthy. It can be followed by physical regression, which results in self loathing, yet again. I’ve seen the cycle repeat itself over and over again in people and it gets them nowhere. If you are interested in a video where I speak about this very topic, motivation and fitness, you can check out this YouTube channel run by my good friend Misti. If you’re looking for videos on manifestation and positivity, definitely check out her videos!!  She is an incredibly inspiring individual who helps people every day bring positive thinking into their lives. 



I often hear people referring to working out as a punishment for the unhealthy food they ate over the weekend, or for being too busy to work out the week before. That can be a very negative frame of mind with which to approach exercise. Moving and weight training should be a positive journey, whether you’re trying to make yourself stronger, faster, or for more endurance. It should be a discovery of what your body is capable of accomplishing day in, and day out. I’m not a competitive powerlifter, but I can deadlift 315 (conventional, not sumo, for those keeping track), and I’m very intentional in never training, lifting, or eating healthy as a punishment to my body. I’ve gotten very strong out of celebration of my body and out of curiosity. I celebrate when my body can do a certain amount of work, and then I get curious…let’s see what else it can do? I’ve trained many women over the years and within a month I have them pushing and pulling weights that they never thought they would do. They became more capable than they imagined they would and it made all the hard work fun! With that, losing weight and losing inches came as a bonus!

It’s very easy to get caught up in the aesthetic aspects of working out, even for veterans in the gym. I think that social media is responsible for a lot of the pressure we face in recent days to look a certain way or maintain a certain lifestyle. There’s more pressure than ever to look perfect and look like you have your life together. But that’s not reality, is it? Perfection can never be attained. Using that for motivation is futile and only leads to an unhealthy view of yourself and others. The pressure that you put on yourself to look a certain way can be very toxic. There are a myriad of different body types, which makes it impossible for some people to achieve a certain look or shape in a physically healthy way. So before you start comparing your body to those Instagram models we all see every day, think about your genetics and see their unique potential. My body type will never allow me to look like any of the Kardashians, so it’s pointless for me to waste my energy trying. My natural genetics make me tend to gain body fat on my stomach, not my butt or my legs. Think Spongebob… So to achieve the narrow, six-pack-abs waistline with a huge bubble butt, would only lead me to failure. Big failure. But…My genetics allow me to get strong, and that’s what feels best for me to pursue. My body feels it’s best when I’m challenging my strength and performance because that’s what my body type lends itself to. So take a moment to see the potential in your own genetics. I guarantee that your potential is much greater than just how you look in a pair of leggings!

Instead of relying on a negative state of mind to find and maintain your motivation, look to add positive things to your life! Add strength and endurance. Add years to your life. Make a goal to walk/run races with your kids or your friends. Join a martial arts class. Check out a dance class for adults. Try crossfit or yoga. There are countless communities to get involved in and they have the potential to be an incredibly positive force in your life and your future health! So instead of hating your body, begin doing things to add to your life, because your body isn’t actually you, right? Your body is just the physical representation of you. Who you are has always been and always be fluid. Everyone grows and changes over time, and that’s a good thing. It only makes sense that your body will be a fluid representation of you as well. So adding positive things to your life will have a healthier impact on you and your body than a negative punishment. Positivity will take you further than negativity every time.


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Stop Dieting! Have a Health Approach to Eating Habits!

There are fad diets and different eating plans and advice on nutrition everywhere you look. Especially at the beginning of the year, there are individuals and businesses trying to capitalize on people’s resolutions to get healthier. Throughout the year, they prey on people’s insecurities to convince them that buying into a diet will provide the magic cure for their body image issues. Does it work? Does any of it work? Statically, no. Obesity is at an all time high in America. An estimated 40% of American adults are battling obesity these days and it looks like those numbers are on the rise. Although I could write whole articles of the causes of obesity/ being overweight and the populations that are more at risk and why, today I’m going to write about simplifying nutrition. 

Along with a sedentary lifestyle, an over busy work schedule, and the incredible convenience of unhealthy food choices, mis-information about nutrition contributes in a big way to people being unable to stick to habits of healthy eating. So what’s the secret? Honestly, the best nutrition plan is one that you can stick to–even if it’s imperfect. It’s true! Turning your life upside down and changing everything in pursuit of a healthier body is usually unsustainable for the long-term. The most balanced solution is finding one change you can implement at a time. Take one meal in your day and change it to something healthier that you can reasonably stick to. Be consistent with that change Remember! It takes 21 days to create a habit. After you created your new habit, it’s time to take the next step! One baby step at a time can lead to huge progress over time.

Consistency will always outweigh intensity when it comes to a healthy body and a healthy mind. That goes for everything, not just nutrition. Whether it’s your eating habits, exercise, or meditation, being consistent with the steps you take will take you further than burning out with high intensity. If you’re looking for more information on exercise, check out the fitness section of my site or enroll in my online training!

An important thing to always keep in mind is how crucial it is to get “back on the wagon” when you fall off. And we all fall off sometimes. I, personally, try to eat well, eight out of ten times. And that’s good for me! Some weeks it’s more like five or six out of ten. I’m never 100% on point with my nutrition and I have no intention to ever be perfect with my it. I’m not a bodybuilder trying to get on stage . I’m not a professional athlete. I’m not a public figure with a team of people helping me live my life. I’m just a woman who has a full time job helping people. I’m a mother. I’m a wife. I’m a friend. I struggle with depression. I struggle with social anxiety. I don’t have the time or capacity to be perfect with my nutrition or my workouts and I never will. And I’m willing to bet that nine out of ten people are just like me. Which means falling off is part of the journey, right? Just like getting back on track–it’s all part of the process. 

So expect to fall off! Expect motivation to come and go like waves at a beach. Expect real life to kick your ass sometimes. It’s okay. It’s not a failure. It’s just part of the journey that we’re all on. Just don’t give up. When you can, get back on track. One step at a time. Getting back on track might look different every time, and that’s okay too! The important thing is that you show up to your own life and you try.

That being said, eating healthy does not have to be complicated. Granted, eating healthy can be repetitive, especially if you’re on a budget like I am. But, if it doesn’t work for you or your life, you don’t have to make it complicated with carbohydrate cycling, or the keto diet, or intermittent fasting, and all that stuff. All of which are viable eating approaches if they work for you! But if we’re talking about just the basics, clean eating is actually pretty simple. Your body needs protein regularly throughout the day. This is really important if you’re working towards more muscle tone and you’re lifting weights.

Clean eating doesn’t have to complicated, it just has to be consistent.

It’s good if you eat veggies every time you eat as well. I, personally, get too full/bloated if I eat veggies every time I eat, but veggies are great if you feel like you’re used to eating bigger portions and need to feel more full. For most people, it will be carbs that will make or break their ability to lean out or not. Most people need one serving of carbohydrates before they work out and one serving after they workout. Carbs are your fuel! If you’re going to be using fuel, you”ll need some! If not, you don’t really need any. Most of us don’t burn a whole lot of energy with our day to day life, so more often than not, you just need good protein and some veggies. If it’s a rest day, one serving of carbs first thing in the morning is all you really need. I you want your very own Clean Eating Guide, subscribe to my blog and I’ll send you one for free!

This cheat sheet breaks down a simple list of options and serving sizes of lean proteins, high quality veggies, and good choices for carbohydrates. Now keep in mind that every person is different. Everyone is a different size, has different genetics, different body chemistry, and different schedules. So my guide is really just meant to be used as a tool to help you set up a plan that works for you. If you feel run down and out of energy, you may need to tweak how much protein or carbs you take in, so tweak away!! 

You’ll notice, though, that most everything on the lists are whole, raw foods. That’s not by accident! If health is a pursuit of yours, trying to incorporate real foods (not just food products) is crucial to improving your health. Our bodies were not designed to process or use the preservatives and chemicals found in ready-made food products. Even if you didn’t change portions or timing of your meals, if you just changed from processed foods to real foods, your body will function more properly and you will feel better. Simply because your body won’t be slowed down by the artificial chemicals and preservatives!

The great news about my food guide is that it’s not a diet! That’s right! You’ll never have to diet again. It’s just clean eating knowledge that you follow as much as you choose. Like I mentioned earlier, a good goal for me is eating clean 8 out of 10 times. If I wanted to lean out (or make up for a week when I followed it five out of ten times) I would follow it more often. I’ve had so many clients that had great results with this approach to eating because it works! 

Nutrition doesn’t have to be complicated for it to work, and definitely doesn’t have to be expensive. Good nutrition just needs to be consistent for it to work. Choosing small steps that you can realistically make into a habit will help you out more in the long run than a short lived diet plan. Just keep taking the right steps for you!



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In Pursuit of Yourself || In Pursuit of Balance

“I am, somehow, less interested in the weight and convolutions of Einstein’s brain than in the near certainty that people of equal talent have lived and died in cotton fields and sweatshops.” -Steven Jay Gould

In Pursuit of Nutrition Balance: Why am I eating AGAIN? || In the Pursuit of Balance

I’m sitting on the couch and constantly finding myself wondering what I can eat next…. Sound familiar to anyone else? Please tell me I’m not alone on this! I’m usually on the go and busy with work so now that I am at home looking for things to occupy my time with, I feel hungry all the time. Is it because my body needs more food? Hell no!

In Pursuit of Normal: Four Ways to Help Cope With COVID-19 Quarantine Measures| In Pursuit of Balance

Right now everything is in a bit of upheaval. I’m not working for at least two weeks, but it will probably be more than that. I don’t have any guaranteed money coming in after those two weeks and it’s very stressful to think about. One thing about me that is just a part of me … Continue reading In Pursuit of Normal: Four Ways to Help Cope With COVID-19 Quarantine Measures| In Pursuit of Balance